As a whole, I believe economic development a new larger impact on colonial settlement than spiritual concerns, nevertheless this differs with the individual colonies. Every single colony acquired something different to supply England and a different purpose for settling. New Great britain came about since the Puritans and Separatists wished a place to worship cost-free the original Cathedral of England. Virginia, on the other hand, was established at first as a control colony and base pertaining to gold and precious metal trips. The Maryland colony opened in order to further more the farming of certain crops like tobacco. Religious beliefs was rarely ever pushed aside in the colonies. It was a strong and important force for almost all settlers; it just wasn't always their driving force. Great britain held monetary control over every colonies and did not let anything get in the way of that. Va became a great agricultural arrangement that helped bring large amounts pounds to Britain. Religion was important and valued above everything other than money. The colony of Maryland was handed by Charles I to George Calvert, whose son (Cecilius Calvert) allowed freedom of religion to all or any Christian settlers in the colony. That was your biggest big difference between Baltimore and Va, who both became agricultural societies fairly quickly. Indentured servants were transported to job the areas, which created a populous community and a very good economy. Fresh England was made for more than only a place for the Puritans and Separatists to praise freely. Due to American effect in British lifestyle (mainly food), the population doubled, bringing about high inflation, a very out of balance wealth syndication, and a plummeting overall economy. As a result of overpopulation and poverty, people were attracted to North America. Among the list of attracted everyone was Puritans and Separatists, who have could both escape lower income and start a fresh colony based off of their particular religious values. These people were rebels inside the eyes of the English structure, and therefore...